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HOW TO CHOOSE THE RIGHT SNOW SUIT FOR YOUR CHILDREN

HOW TO CHOOSE THE RIGHT SNOW SUIT FOR YOUR CHILDREN

One Piece Vs. 2 Piece

One-piece snow suits are more suitable for baby's and infants who are not as active outside. For example, if the child will mostly be held in the parent's arms or pushed in a stroller, then a one-piece snow suit is the best option. Another benefit of a one-piece snow suit is that no wind can enter from the waist, thus providing extra warmth for your child.


Two-piece snow suits are more suitable for children who are active outside. For example, if your child is playing outside at recess or after school, then they will have more freedom to play and explore in a 2-piece snow suit.

Snow Suit Fabrics

For active children, synthetic fibers are a good choice for the filling of the snow suit. These fibers don't absorb water as much as down fill, so you child will stay dryer when playing in wet snow and the snow suit will dry quicker if it does get wet. Down filled jackets are more suitable for dry cold weather. So, if your child will be walking, but not playing in the snow, then a down filled jacket would suffice.

Snow suits have millimeter (mm) ratings which indicate how waterproof the fabric is. For example, if the waterproof level indicated is 5,000mm, then the fabric can resist water up to a height of 5,000mm before it would leak through. For children playing outside in wet snow, a higher millimeter (mm) rating is extremely important.

Good snow suits for outside have the ability to be water-resistant yet breathable. Water resistance is achieved by using Teflon® or PU (Polyurethane) fabrics on the exterior which are treated with a solution called DWR (Durable Water Repellent) which prevent it from soaking up water. A snow suit is made breathable by tiny holes which are too small to let in liquid, but large enough to allow water vapor (sweat) to escape. Letting out sweat is critical to ensuring that your child stays dry inside the snow suit. This is the reason that a quality snow suit will show several layers of fabrics, all of which have the purpose of making the snow suit breathable, yet water resistant and warm.

Warmth Ratings

Warm ratings are developed with the assumption that the child will remain active. Staying active outdoors allows your child to create the heat needed to stay warm inside the snow suit. The less active a child is (for example, waiting at a bus stop), the more susceptible he or she is to becoming cold. Remember, you can always balance the warmth levels by adding layers of clothing beneath the snow suit depending on how cold it is outside, and how long your child will play outdoors (see below for more information on layers).

Snow Suit Features

When buying a snow suit, extra features usually equals extra costs. Some examples of extra features are: a fur hood, magnetic pockets, or decorative bets. Although some of these accessories may be practical, some may not. Reflective materials may be desirable features since they help your child become more visible to automobiles at night time. Fur around the hood may be less desirable for playing outside since it can impair the child's lateral vision when the hood is being worn, and it can absorb moisture. In general, choose the features which will increase your child's safety and comfort. If the jacket is being used as a fashion accessory, then the less practical features may be suitable.

Base Layers for Cold Weather

The key to layering is to trap warm air and insulate the heat from the child's body. The materials which do this best will not only trap heat but absorb moisture away from the body, to be evaporated outside the snow suit. Wool products, such as Marino wool base layers and socks are one of the best choices. Base layers should be fitted on the child's body and not too lose otherwise they won't keep the body as warm. Fleece thermal wear is also a great choice for base layers, and so are "thermal interlock fabrics" which contain some cotton but are designed for breathability and insulation. Cotton t-shirts are not a good choice since cotton loses its insulation properties when it becomes wet from body moisture.

Sources

One Piece Vs. 2 Piece

One-piece snow suits are more suitable for baby's and infants who are not as active outside. For example, if the child will mostly be held in the parent's arms or pushed in a stroller, then a one-piece snow suit is the best option. Another benefit of a one-piece snow suit is that no wind can enter from the waist, thus providing extra warmth for your child.


Two-piece snow suits are more suitable for children who are active outside. For example, if your child is playing outside at recess or after school, then they will have more freedom to play and explore in a 2-piece snow suit.

Snow Suit Fabrics

For active children, synthetic fibers are a good choice for the filling of the snow suit. These fibers don't absorb water as much as down fill, so you child will stay dryer when playing in wet snow and the snow suit will dry quicker if it does get wet. Down filled jackets are more suitable for dry cold weather. So, if your child will be walking, but not playing in the snow, then a down filled jacket would suffice.

Snow suits have millimeter (mm) ratings which indicate how waterproof the fabric is. For example, if the waterproof level indicated is 5,000mm, then the fabric can resist water up to a height of 5,000mm before it would leak through. For children playing outside in wet snow, a higher millimeter (mm) rating is extremely important.

Good snow suits for outside have the ability to be water-resistant yet breathable. Water resistance is achieved by using Teflon® or PU (Polyurethane) fabrics on the exterior which are treated with a solution called DWR (Durable Water Repellent) which prevent it from soaking up water. A snow suit is made breathable by tiny holes which are too small to let in liquid, but large enough to allow water vapor (sweat) to escape. Letting out sweat is critical to ensuring that your child stays dry inside the snow suit. This is the reason that a quality snow suit will show several layers of fabrics, all of which have the purpose of making the snow suit breathable, yet water resistant and warm.

Warmth Ratings

Warm ratings are developed with the assumption that the child will remain active. Staying active outdoors allows your child to create the heat needed to stay warm inside the snow suit. The less active a child is (for example, waiting at a bus stop), the more susceptible he or she is to becoming cold. Remember, you can always balance the warmth levels by adding layers of clothing beneath the snow suit depending on how cold it is outside, and how long your child will play outdoors (see below for more information on layers).

Snow Suit Features

When buying a snow suit, extra features usually equals extra costs. Some examples of extra features are: a fur hood, magnetic pockets, or decorative bets. Although some of these accessories may be practical, some may not. Reflective materials may be desirable features since they help your child become more visible to automobiles at night time. Fur around the hood may be less desirable for playing outside since it can impair the child's lateral vision when the hood is being worn, and it can absorb moisture. In general, choose the features which will increase your child's safety and comfort. If the jacket is being used as a fashion accessory, then the less practical features may be suitable.

Base Layers for Cold Weather

The key to layering is to trap warm air and insulate the heat from the child's body. The materials which do this best will not only trap heat but absorb moisture away from the body, to be evaporated outside the snow suit. Wool products, such as Marino wool base layers and socks are one of the best choices. Base layers should be fitted on the child's body and not too lose otherwise they won't keep the body as warm. Fleece thermal wear is also a great choice for base layers, and so are "thermal interlock fabrics" which contain some cotton but are designed for breathability and insulation. Cotton t-shirts are not a good choice since cotton loses its insulation properties when it becomes wet from body moisture.

Sources

https://www.evo.com/guides/outerwear-waterproof-ratings-and-breathability

https://www.wikihow.mom/Buy-a-Child%27s-Snowsuit

https://www.getoutwiththekids.co.uk/family-hiking/base-layers-for-kids/

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